Joyce Z. and Jacob Greenberg Center for Jewish Studies
1155 East 60th Street, Room 302A
Chicago, IL 60637
773.702.7108
ccjs@uchicago.edu

Please join us for a Primo Levi Study Day, beginning the evening of October 28. Read more here.

For the second year, the Graduate Student Advisory Board of the Greenberg Center has organized a colloquium for fourth-year undergraduates to present their BA theses. Pictured left to right are Olivia Rosenzweig, Isaac Johnston, and Rebecca Julie. Read more here.

In Geveb intern, second-year Jonah Lubin, gives a student's view of the Debora Vogel symposium. Read here.

 

The Shanghai Jews: Risk and Resilience in a Refugee Community

From January 15 – March 25 an exhibit of artifacts from Jewish refugee life in Shanghai China was held in Regenstein Library, culminating in a two-day symposium on March 13–14. For the list of participants and a full schedule of the programs click on the link here. For information and photos of the exhibit and conference and a recording of the opening event on March 13, please click on the link here.

On November 28 the conference "When A Great Tradition Modernizes: Judaism and Its Engagement with Politics and Culture" honored the scholarship and teaching of Paul Mendes-Flohr. See the conference speakers and schedule.

The Chicago Center for Jewish Studies, now the Joyce Z. and Jacob Greenberg Center for Jewish Studies, was created in 2009 as an inter-divisional center in the Divisions of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Divinity School whose aim is to nurture dialogue among the many disciplines, scholars, and students engaged in Jewish Studies at the University. Building on the particularly theoretical and interdisciplinary intellectual culture of Chicago, the Center aims to raise new questions and catalyze unexplored connections that will reconfigure the boundaries of Jewish Studies both within and beyond the walls of the University

Jewish Studies ranges from the ancient world to today, from Israel to the ends of the Diaspora, from Hebrew to Arabic and Yiddish. Its literatures, peoples, religious traditions, history, and culture are investigated in every discipline in the human sciences. The University of Chicago is a leading center of multidisciplinary scholarship and education in Jewish Studies. Our faculty and students pursue the varied fields of Jewish Studies in departments such as Comparative Literature, Germanics, History, Music, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Philosophy, Political Science, Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Committee on Social Thought, and in the Divinity School. The University boasts special strengths in the interdisciplinary constellations of Bible, ancient Near Eastern history and archeology, and the history of scriptural interpretation; medieval Jewish thought and intellectual history; German-Jewish literature and culture; and modern Jewish history, philosophy, and culture.

The Center is also engaged in developing new models for undergraduate education in Jewish Studies and new institutional structures to enhance graduate students’ departmental training. It serves as a hub to publicize the many resources in Jewish Studies available at the University, and it guides students to them. It also coordinates the awarding of dissertation year fellowships, provides graduate student travel and research grants, and funds a variety of undergraduate projects.

News

June 27, 6 pm, The Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Warsaw, UChicago Prof. Bozena Shallcross will deliver the lecture, "Jankiel's Concert: Romantic Performativity and Jewish Agency." This lecture is part of the... read more

The Greenberg Center is pleased to acknowledge the new research published by our faculty members and graduate students. Read more about the work of PhD students Chelsie May, Michal Peles-Almagor and Joel Swanson.

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The Greenberg Center for Jewish Studies is pleased to announce its annual Essay Prize Competition for essays on any topic relating to Jewish Studies, including (but not restricted to) the study of Jewish history, religion... read more